Singapore in 36 hours stopover as a short vacation

Experience Singapore in 36 hours – is that possible? Yes, if you limit yourself to the most important sights during a stopover in Singapore. We show what you have to see, including three 360-degree panoramas. Psst: 48 hours would be better If you fly to Australia, Bali or New Zealand with Singapore Airlines, it is best to extend the transfer time and refine the journey with a Singapore stopover for a city break. The Singapore Stopover Holiday (SSH) program makes it possible. From 33 euros per person there is a good hotel, bus transfer to and from the airport, free travel on the SIA hop-on bus and free entry to most of the major sights worth over 350 euros. It couldn’t be better. Marina Bay Sands Our Singapore stopover starts at the landmark of the boomtown. From the lush Sky Garden of the three-tower hotel at a height of 200 meters and from the 150-meter-long infinity pool you have a great view of the Singapore skyline. Unfortunately, only hotel guests are allowed to swim. MRT station: Bayfront Singapore Flyer The tall Ferris wheel was the tallest in the world until 2014. Worth seeing and experiencing and free for SSH customers, otherwise 22 euros.  MRT station: Promenade Gardens by the Bay 50 meter high supertrees overgrown with climbing plants, which in the evening provide the backdrop for a sound & light show. Two ultra-modern greenhouses: Flower Dome (largest glass greenhouse in the world) and Cloud Forest. Entry to both “Conservatories” is free for SSH customers, otherwise it costs 18 euros. MRT station: Bayfront Colonial District There is always lively activity around the water-spouting stone sculpture of the Merlion (half lion, half fish). This is also where the excursion boats leave: On the Singapore River Cruise or on one of the Original Singapore Walks (one of five walks is free, otherwise 12 or 19 euros) you can feel the pulse of the colonial heart of the Glamor City: Cavenagh Bridge, Elgin Bridge , Empress Place Building, The Fullerton Hotel, statue of Sir Stamford Ra ffles and Clarke Quay. Or just stroll along the Singapore River on your own, from the party mile Clarke Quay to Robertson Quay and back. MRT station: City Hall   Chinatown Lively streets with shops for Chinese stamps, silk clothes, lanterns, shops for Chinese medicine and dozens of restaurants. The “Yum Cha” is the perfect stop for dim sum. The pastel-colored facades from the 19th century are typical of the shophouse architecture of that era. Don’t miss the Chinatown Heritage Center, the Indian Sri Mariamman Temple, the Temple of the Toothed Buddha and the Thian Hock Keng Temple. MRT station: Chinatown